Chef Tony doesn’t want to spend a day in the kitchen without his trusty rice cooker.

From his start as a singing waiter at his father’s restaurant to a stint as the executive chef for the royal family of Jordan, Chef Tony Biggs’ culinary journey has as many twists and turns as a book you can’t put down (something he’s working on writing, as well). You may recognize his charming, larger-than-life personality from several TV appearances, including Food Network’s “Chopped,” during your visit to The Culinary Center.

Braising. Cooking beef “low and slow” may not be the flashiest way, but the culinary magic it achieves makes it classical for good reason.

What has most greatly influenced your culinary point of view?

Without a doubt, it’s my extensive travels and a career that’s taken me around the world. In addition to my time with the royal family of Jordan, I’ve led the kitchens of the Casino 5-Star Resorts in the Philippines, the Tokyo American Club in Japan, and the Hyatt Hotels in the United States and Caribbean. I got an amazing foundation at the Culinary Institute of America, but these international experiences have helped me pick up techniques, flavors and insights that influence my work every day with brand partners at The Culinary Center.

Garlic is an ingredient that crosses cultures and cuisines – and an integral part of Chef Tony’s flavorful dishes.

What do you love most about food and being a chef?

To me, there’s nothing better than sharing my love of food with others who truly appreciate it, as well. I also think food is the best way to make connections with others. We can learn so much about each other when we do it over good food. I also love to teach others by sharing my perspective and experiences, and learning from them in return.